Szervető-jazygia

Szervető-jazygia

Szervető-jazygia

These nice flowers are traditional embroidery motifs of the northem part of the Great Hungarian Plain, that is also known as Jazygia, named after the last ancient Indo-Iranian people who moved into the Carpathian Basin in the 13th century. 

They have preserved their cultural identity until the present day. The ornamentation displayed tendrils and flowers, which are typical of nomadic cultures. From the Middle Ages this was mainly used by furriers for decorating jackets and other outerwears.

 

The cultural and economic centre of region Jászság: Jászberény
Jászberény lies 80 kilometres east of Budapest and 40 kilometres south of the Matra mountains on the banks of the Rivers Zagyva and Tarna. This region is a kind of transition from the Great Hungarian Plain to the slopes of the Matra Mountains, which wheather permitting, can clearly be seen from the town.
Jászberény, which has 28 thousand inhabitants, possesses unique geographical, ethnical and historical features. 
The countryside surrounding the town has preserved its long standing characteristics, an outing, a walk along the river Zagyva in Hajta nature conservation area or along the romantic, almost untouched grovy banks of old -Zagyva, can be an unforgettable experience.
The River Zagyva
Hajta nature conservation area
Jász (or Jazygian) people of Asian origin arrived in the Carpathian basin along with the Kun people in the 13th century. The Hungarian king granted them the territory of Jászság, Kunság and Nagykunság (Triple Boroughs) to settle down. In return they were expected to provide the King with soldiers. The Hungarian sovereigns granted Jász and Kún people special privileges. They had lived freely and cultivated their own land not belonging to any of the royal boroughs for centuries. Jászberény was the administrative, cultural, and religious centre of the independent region. As the Ottoman occupation of Hungary ended, emperor Lipoth I. sold this territory to the German Order of Knighthood. This act ended the privileged position of Jászság and its people sank into serfdom.
Headquarters of the one-time Triple Boroughs, nowadays it houses the Law-courts
Monument to Jász people
However, Jász and Kun people joined their forces to raise the money necessary to redeem themselves and empress Maria Therese granted them their previous privileges. This was the so called "redemption" -redeeming themselves- a peculiar event in Hungarian history. 
The rapid development after 1745 showed bourgeois characteristics. The people living here were neither rich nor poor, formed a kind of middle class and cultivated their own land independently not as serfs. Jászberény remained the centre of the Triple Boroughs till the reform of the administration in the country in 1867. At present Jászberény is the centre of the smaller region called Jászság. 
A permanent exhibition in Jász Museum tells us about the events and relics of the past. This museum, which was officially founded by the town in 1873. houses one of the most beautiful and oldest collections in the country. The symbol of Jász people, our precious national relic, Lehel´s horn can be seen here. This beautifully carved ivory horn dates back to the 11th-12th centuries. The permanent exhibition displays the origin of Jász people, their migration, settlement in Hungary, how they lived, cultivated their land, the diverse products of their traditional craftsmen, the spiritual and cultural values of Jászság. Apart from the rich local historical collection the museum houses periodic exhibitions, to provide free scope for showing other aspects of the rich collection as well as to exhibit the masterpieces of local artists.
Lehel´s Horn
Jász Museum

 

Read more: http://www.jaszbereny.hu/introduction.php